Updates and Information on Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Publications & Research

The Boyd Center conducts research on behalf of multiple public entities to reveal key insights about the economy in Tennessee and across the nation, as well as the efficacy of public programs. Our research has appeared in publications such as The Economist, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, The Washington Post and The Tennessean.

Use the search field below to find Boyd Center for Business and Economic Research publications by title, author, or date of publication.

Tennessee Business and Economic Outlook, Fall 2015

Authors: Matthew N. Murray, Lawrence M. Kessler

Publication Date: November 1, 2015

In Tennessee total tax collections grew by 9.3 percent during the first quarter of 2015 (as compared to the first quarter of 2014). This was higher than both the southeast average of 6.5 percent and the national average of 5.1 percent. Among the southeastern states, only Mississippi and North Carolina registered higher tax revenue growth than Tennessee. For the month of August, Tennessee Department of Revenue tax collections totaled $898.4 million, which was $28.5 million or 3.3 percent higher than August’s collections from last year.

The Impact of TennCare: A Survey of Recipients, 2015

Authors: LeAnn Luna, Angela R. Thacker

Publication Date: October 1, 2015

The Center for Business and Economic Research (CBER) at the University of Tennessee, under contract with the Department of Finance and Administration of the State of Tennessee, conducted a survey of Tennessee residents to ascertain their insurance status and use of medical facilities. A target sample size of 5,000 households allows for obtaining accurate estimates for subpopulations. CBER prepared the survey instrument in cooperation with personnel from the Bureau of TennCare.

Basic Education Program (BEP) 2.0 Fiscal Capacity Inputs, 2007-2015

Authors: Boyd Center for Business and Economic Research

Publication Date: July 1, 2015

The Basic Education Program 2.0 (BEP) outlines the funding formula used to allocate state education dollars to Tennessee’s k-12 schools. This formula compares a locality’s average tax rate to its tax use to calculate a percentage reflecting its ability to generate revenue from its own base to cover educational resource needs.

Tennessee Business and Economic Outlook, Spring 2015

Authors: Matthew N. Murray

Publication Date: May 1, 2015

In Tennessee, total tax collections grew by 4.6 percent during the third quarter of 2014. This was faster than both the southeast average of 3.2 percent and the national average of 4.4 percent. Among the 12 southeastern states, only South Carolina, Mississippi, Virginia, and Florida experienced faster revenue growth than Tennessee (see Figure 8). As of March 2015, Tennessee Department of Revenue tax collections have totaled $7,797.9 million for the fiscal year-to-date (August 2014 through March 2015), representing a $535.4 million or 7.4 percent increase over last fiscal year. The 7.4 percent expansion in tax revenues has largely been driven by sales tax revenues which are up $269.8 million or 5.7 percent, and franchise and excise tax revenues (corporate income taxes) which have grown by $232.8 million or 24.5 percent compared to last fiscal year-to-date.

Pages

arrow csv pdf doc xls folder-download stats-bars