Updates and Information on Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Publications & Research

The Boyd Center conducts research on behalf of multiple public entities to reveal key insights about the economy in Tennessee and across the nation, as well as the efficacy of public programs. Our research has appeared in publications such as The Economist, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, The Washington Post and The Tennessean.

Use the search field below to find Boyd Center for Business and Economic Research publications by title, author, or date of publication.

A Profile of Hispanic Population in the State of Tennessee

Authors: Nicholas N. Nagel, Randy Gustafson, Charlynn Burd

Publication Date: October 1, 2012

This report documents the place of Hispanic persons in Tennessee. About half of the Hispanic persons in Tennessee are foreign-born, and half were born in the United States. Most of these native-born persons are children. In the next few years, one-in-ten children entering kindergarten in Tennessee will be Hispanic. In 20 years, these children will be Tennessee’s labor force. If their education is like that in many other states, these children are less likely to complete high school and be economically self-sufficient adults. Yet, Hispanic children have special requirements; Tennessee’s educational system will need to adapt to these needs if it is to prepare these children for the workforce, and to remain economically competitive.

Tennessee 2010 at a Glance: A compendium of State and County Information from the 2010 Census and the 2006-2010 American Community Survey

Authors: Tennessee State Data Center

Publication Date: August 1, 2012

Tennessee’s population grew 656,822 or 11.5 percent to 6,346,105 between the 2000 and 2010 Censuses. This compares to a 9.7 percent growth rate for the nation as a whole. The older population in Tennessee grew an astounding 21.3 percent from 2000 to 2010. This outpaces the US 2000 to 2010 growth rate of 15.1 percent. If the future of Tennessee rests with its children, the state faces a mixed bag of trends. The growth rate from 2000 to 2010 was much less for children than for the population as a whole, coming in at 7.0 percent. However, this growth rate compares quite favorably with the national rate of just 2.6 percent. In 2010, Tennessee ranked 45th in median household income, with the nearby states of Mississippi, West Virginia, Arkansas, Kentucky, and Alabama exhibiting lower incomes. In 2000, median income in Tennessee was $36,360 and for the US it was $41,994.

2003 County Business Patterns: Tennessee by Major Industry

Authors: CBER

Publication Date: August 6, 2005

General Demographic Changes in Tennessee: 1990-2000

Authors: Paula Dowell, CBER

Publication Date: August 1, 2001

Pages

arrow csv pdf doc xls folder-download stats-bars