UT’s Haslam College of Business 32nd Among Public Undergrad Programs

December 18, 2018

Poets & Quants has named the undergraduate education at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville’s Haslam College of Business as the 32nd best among public institutions in 2018.

The rankings, released on Thursday, Dec. 13, were based on a representative survey of nearly 13,000 alumni as well as school-reported data. Students and colleges across 88 universities were graded on aspects of admissions standards, academic experience and career outcomes.

Stephen L. Mangum, dean and Stokely Foundation Leadership Chair at Haslam, said the ranking illustrates how well the college equips students for the business world.

“Our alumni’s success after graduation is a key measure of our abilities as an educational institution,” Mangum said. “The college’s solid showing in Poets & Quants reflects our commitment to preparing our students for careers in business.”

Lane Morris, associate dean of undergraduate programs and student affairs at Haslam, was pleased with the ranking.

“The Haslam College of Business undergraduate program provides a quality education to our students,” Morris said. “Internships and engagement opportunities, both with the faculty and our business partners, add real value to the overall undergraduate experience.” 

A release from Poets & Quants regarding the ranking noted that this was the most competitive ranking since its launch three years ago. “The competition in the higher tier was fierce, stressing the importance of undergraduate business programs across the board,” said Nathan Allen, project manager for the rankings.

The Haslam College of Business, founded in 1914, consists of approximately 5,500 undergraduate and graduate students. Its seven departments, seven centers and institutes, four forums and graduate and executive education programs reach across the for profit, not-for-profit and governmental sectors of business, with a heavy emphasis on practical research. The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, was founded in 1794 and was designated Tennessee’s land-grant institution in 1879.